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DCC get/ Timed out error. #196140 10/03/08 06:29 PM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 2
K
kdob Offline OP
Bowl of petunias
OP Offline
Bowl of petunias
K
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 2
Recently changed ethernet card and dsl modem as mine was a little older and was getting slower. At first I couldn't receive any dcc transfers and it would crash mirc. I then changed back to the older ethernet and now I don't crash and can receive transfers but a lot which get timed out at 99%. The archive looks corrupted also. After multiple times of trying I finally got 1 of the files to complete and work properly. This is from the same sender. Thinking about going back to the older modem. Both modems are from Westell, older one is a beige b90 model, newer is black 6100. Anybody know what could be the problem? I also just noticed a post about turning /pdcc to on and my dcc packetsize is 4096. Was going to put it on 99999 but don't know how. Any info on this would be appreciated.

ALso my download speeds on these files were above 200kbs most of the way through. Don't know exactly what they were at the end.

Re: DCC get/ Timed out error. [Re: kdob] #196154 10/03/08 10:28 PM
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 8,330
Riamus2 Offline
Hoopy frood
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Hoopy frood
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 8,330
First of all, your modem and ethernet card are not going to speed you up any. That's based on your ISP and may also be related to phone line or cable line quality (depending which you use). It is not like dialup, where there are different speed modems.

Second, if you're having problems from one sender, it's most likely that sender who is giving you the problems. Try others.

Third, you cannot set the packet size to 99999. Even if it let you, it would cause problems rather than doing anything to speed things up. You have to understand how packetsize affects transfers... Packet size is used to handle data being transfered. It wouldn't make sense for it to check every byte as it is being sent, so you check each packet instead. If you check 4kB packets, and you "drop" (lose) a packet, you have to redownload the packet. That means redownloading 4kB. If it was a 2kB packet, you'd only be redownloading a 2kB packet. The difference is minor for one packet, but can increase quickly if you drop packets often (or the sender does). So higher isn't always better. On the other hand, lower isn't always better either as you have to check more frequently which can slow things down. In the end, most people get the best speed at 4096. Certain people get better speed at 8192 or 2048. You won't know without trying. Of course, trying requires a LOT of tests from a LOT of senders to really know. Just testing a couple of times from a couple of senders won't really give you valid data. In any case, the difference in speed is minimal.


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