mIRC Home    About    Download    Register    News    Help

Print Thread
IPv6 #134443 01/11/05 01:27 PM
Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,009
raZOR Offline OP
Hoopy frood
OP Offline
Hoopy frood
Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,009
on most sites i visited that talks about this they say
that it will support more ip's, then they show some hex weird values etc...

i wanna ask directly how will IPv6 IP look if current is
111.222.333.444 ?

and in some ipv6 dll for mirc i saw some option BIND ip's
what is that?


IceCapped
Re: IPv6 #134444 01/11/05 03:40 PM
Joined: Jun 2003
Posts: 5,024
M
Mentality Offline
Hoopy frood
Offline
Hoopy frood
M
Joined: Jun 2003
Posts: 5,024
Lots of information can be found in the Wikipedia article on IPv6, look under the Notation heading to see examples of how it looks on IRC. One example from my logs:

[01:18:48] * Nickname (user@2001:618:400:aee7::420) has joined #mIRC

Regards,


Mentality/Chris
Re: IPv6 #134445 01/11/05 06:48 PM
Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,009
raZOR Offline OP
Hoopy frood
OP Offline
Hoopy frood
Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,009
how the hell will i dns someone then?


IceCapped
Re: IPv6 #134446 01/11/05 06:59 PM
Joined: Feb 2003
Posts: 372
R
Rounin Offline
Fjord artisan
Offline
Fjord artisan
R
Joined: Feb 2003
Posts: 372
DNS has separate records for IPv6. That being said, I wonder how people can talk about replacing IPv4, and at the same time be so happy about that archaic DNS system. Bleh. :tongue:

Re: IPv6 #134447 09/11/05 09:21 AM
Joined: Dec 2002
Posts: 2,985
Watchdog Offline
Hoopy frood
Offline
Hoopy frood
Joined: Dec 2002
Posts: 2,985
Archaic it might be but it works. It' a case of whatever works I reckon.

Re: IPv6 #134448 10/11/05 05:23 PM
Joined: Jun 2003
Posts: 23
M
Mouse_103 Offline
Ameglian cow
Offline
Ameglian cow
M
Joined: Jun 2003
Posts: 23

Re: IPv6 #134449 10/11/05 05:58 PM
Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,009
raZOR Offline OP
Hoopy frood
OP Offline
Hoopy frood
Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,009
i find it very confusing and ugly to see every ip
hex looking


IceCapped
Re: IPv6 #134450 10/11/05 06:42 PM
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 8,327
Riamus2 Offline
Hoopy frood
Offline
Hoopy frood
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 8,327
You'd get used to it. Think of how IP addresses are to begin with... It's much easier to type a URL using the DNS than to use the IP because it's easier to remember. Yet, we still consider IPs pretty easy to work with. Once we're used to IPv6, it will probably be the same.

Btw, to find out the IPv6 of a regular IP:

192.123.54.2

Break it apart and find the HEX from the DECIMAL... (I'll use mIRC's $base just for easy explanation):

//echo -a $base(192,10,16)
C0
//echo -a $base(123,10,16)
7B
//echo -a $base(54,10,16)
36
//echo -a $base(2,10,16)
2 Pad this, so it is 02

Ok, so now we put this together to get the hex equivalent:

C07B3602

Now, we split it into groups of 4, split by colons:

C07B:3602

Then, we should have 8 groups of 4, so:

0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:C07B:3602

According to the protocol, you can remove any groups of 4 0's and replace by :: instead of a single :, but you can only have one double : in a grouping. Since we only have sets of 4 zeroes in one section (the beginning), this is easy:

::C07B:3602

That is your IPv6 address based on the IPv4 address. You could use the longer version, but it's a waste of space. Of course, once IPv6 is fully operational and IPv4 is deprecated, I doubt you'll see addresses with only the last 2 groups as shown here.

cool

Oh, and remember that IP uses 255 (FF) as the maximum value for each part of the IP, so 111.222.333.444 would not be a valid IP because of the 333 and 444 sections. wink

One final note... most real IPv6 addresses will start with 2001 (the version) at this point in time. If you are converting the IPv4 to IPv6, I don't believe you are meant to put 2001 at the beginning.


Invision Support
#Invision on irc.irchighway.net
Re: IPv6 #134451 10/11/05 10:05 PM
Joined: Sep 2003
Posts: 4,230
D
DaveC Offline
Hoopy frood
Offline
Hoopy frood
D
Joined: Sep 2003
Posts: 4,230
so IPv6 is going to be 128bit addressing? Damn all them extra zero to send!, how well my 5 times faster bandwidth survive! smile

Re: IPv6 #134452 11/11/05 04:19 PM
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 8,327
Riamus2 Offline
Hoopy frood
Offline
Hoopy frood
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 8,327
Unless I'm mistaken, that looks like 256bit to me. 8 groups of 4 at 8 bits per byte: 8x4x8=256.

And, like I mentioned, all groups of 0's can be removed, and any leading 0's can also be removed:

If the address was:
2001:0000:0000:0234:001c:4350:0001:ae1f

You can remove the groups of 4 0's:
2001::0234:001c:4350:0001:ae1f

Then, remove the leading 0's:
2001::234:1c:4350:1:ae1f

So, it's not going to necessarily be that bad. laugh


Invision Support
#Invision on irc.irchighway.net
Re: IPv6 #134453 11/11/05 05:56 PM
Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,009
raZOR Offline OP
Hoopy frood
OP Offline
Hoopy frood
Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,009
it still looks too much ugly and confusing for normal user :tongue:
still i can see that someone ip is made of 4 groups by 3 numbers 111.222.333.444 and looks ok and organised

but with those hex...
i think many people will be confused and wonder WTF that is ??? :tongue:


IceCapped
Re: IPv6 #134454 11/11/05 06:05 PM
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 8,327
Riamus2 Offline
Hoopy frood
Offline
Hoopy frood
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 8,327
People just need to learn to count in HEX. laugh

From a game I'm translating (where I have to write the text in hex):
Quote:

a1022c02430243024602c402c502a10246024e02c502280249022c02c502600246024c026d01

Translates to:
Quote:

Hello. How are you?

And I can write that very quickly. laugh


Btw, ignore my comment on 256bit... it's 128bit. I was thinking every character was a byte instead of every two characters. Oops. laugh


Invision Support
#Invision on irc.irchighway.net
Re: IPv6 #134455 11/11/05 06:34 PM
Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,009
raZOR Offline OP
Hoopy frood
OP Offline
Hoopy frood
Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,009
Quote:
People just need to learn to count in HEX.


i dont think that normal user who just wants to go online to chat and explore irc a bit is interested in hex-ing :tongue:


IceCapped
Re: IPv6 #134456 11/11/05 07:14 PM
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 8,327
Riamus2 Offline
Hoopy frood
Offline
Hoopy frood
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 8,327
And are they interested in IP's either? laugh

The only time you really care about the address of a user (IP or otherwise) is if you need to ban/op/voice/whatever the person. And, if you're going to be an OP (or higher level) who can do this, you really should learn how to be one (including how to work with addresses). All these people who just become an op just because it sounds cool and who have no idea what they are doing are bad. smile

And, it's not like you have to figure out the address anyhow. If you see an IPv6 address or a IPv4 address, you're going to ban them the same way, though there may be some other methods for banning ranges. smile


Invision Support
#Invision on irc.irchighway.net
Re: IPv6 #134457 16/11/05 12:21 PM
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 1
V
vade79 Offline
Mostly harmless
Offline
Mostly harmless
V
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 1
a better question is, when is mirc going to support ipv6?
after i got my tunnel setup and routing throughout my LAN i was amazed to find ipv6 support wasnt implemented yet (as of v6.16?). which to be honest, surprised me. right now i have to use some third party dll for it to operate, and i think its a bit funky.

Re: IPv6 #134458 19/11/05 02:45 AM
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,741
G
genius_at_work Offline
Hoopy frood
Offline
Hoopy frood
G
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,741
I think it is actually 128bit. Each character in the address is a hexadecimal digit, and represents 4 binary digits.

Hex -> Bin
0 -> 0000
1 -> 0000
...
E -> 1110
F -> 1111

So your example:
2001:0000:0000:0234:001c:4350:0001:ae1f (HEX-base16)

Translates to:
0010 0000 0000 0001:0000 0000 0000 0000:0000 0000 0000 0000:0000 0010 0011 0100:
0000 0000 0001 1100:0000 0000 0000 0001:0100 0011 0101 0000:1010 1110 0001 1111 (BIN-base2)

8 * 4 * 4 = 128 ((8 groups) * (4 nibbles/group) * (4 bits/nibble))

or if you are assuming every 2 characters represents 0-255 decimal, the equation would be:

8 * 2 * 8 = 128 ((8 groups) * (2 bytes/group) * (8 bits/byte))

-genius_at_work