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IPv6 #80893 27/04/04 09:34 PM
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Kevin666 Offline OP
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when will there be ipv6 support in mIRC???

Re: IPv6 #80894 27/04/04 09:36 PM
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please do not keeping asking this, use the search feature.


New username: hixxy
Re: IPv6 #80895 27/04/04 09:39 PM
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sorry, it would be cool to have it

Re: IPv6 #80896 27/04/04 09:42 PM
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IPV6 has been requested on numerous occasions in the past, here is one such thread.

It's always a good idea to use the Search feature to make sure something hasn't been posted before. If you search for "IPv6", expand to 'Feature Suggestions' and 'All Posts' then you'll see 5 pages of search results smile - Worth noting Khaled does not release information on what will be included in the next version of mIRC, so it's hard to say "when" (or even if) mIRC will support IPv6. Given the length of time this suggestion has been going on I doubt it will be included, but who knows.

Personally, I don't fully understand what mIRC has got to do with it or why people would want it...

Happy searchin', and thanks for the suggestion smile

Regards,


Mentality/Chris
Re: IPv6 #80897 27/04/04 09:53 PM
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Wolfie Offline
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Maybe I'm lost or something, but isn't mIRC designed to support what the O.S. supports? ie, if the OS can support IPv6 then mIRC automatically can to? Or are there specific features, like /dns, that would need to be updated as well?

:-\
I know I'm sounded stupid but I seriously thought that was/is the case.

Re: IPv6 #80898 27/04/04 10:01 PM
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You don't sound stupid at all, I'm not "up" on my IPv6 knowledge either - dunno about you, but this page made it a little easier to understand why people may want mIRC to support it...I don't mind either way still.
These search results may also help others understand what IPv6 is.

And seeing as mIRC is a program that runs on the OS, it must (ultimately) stay within the boundaries of the OS's capabilities, or so I would have thought.

Regards,


Mentality/Chris
Re: IPv6 #80899 28/04/04 05:13 AM
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Kevin666 Offline OP
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sooner or later, they are going to run out of ipv4 ip's, so they made ipv6 (i guess) and right now you have to run a bouncer type of program to use ipv6 with mirc, i guess people want it because its another way to hide your ip, and as in one of the posts on here, to have a special "leetness"

Re: IPv6 #80900 28/04/04 06:20 AM
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There is still around 1 billion IP4 addresses left I wouldn't worry too much about running out of them. If you want to hide your IP/Hostname at a cost/effort of 0% then you could use a network that offers such a feature built in to the IRCd. There's plenty of networks that offer it, even without having to issue a MODE command.

Re: IPv6 #80901 28/04/04 07:43 AM
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Making assumptions here...
If every IP were possible (with the highest IPv4 address being 255.255.255.254), we could have 4,294,967,294 addresses.. If it were a 5 point system (256^5-2) you have 1,099,511,627,774 addresses available. I know that IPv6 is more involved than just 0-255.. But just with the 5 point system (which IPv5 was skipped as it was for something else that got scrapped).. My question is.. What IP range is going to be for those on the moon?
grin
Every walking person on earth, their cat, dog, tv, microwave, watch, car, cell phone and toilet could have an IP address and only make a scratch in the available addresses...

Just some food for thought. (One day I might actually read the details of IPv6.. But knowing that it's a 128bit addressing system is.. well... WHOA)


Re: IPv6 #80902 28/04/04 08:34 AM
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Hrung Offline
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128 bit addressing means 340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211,456 total addresses (assuming all of them can be used). That number is so large that it doesn't even mean anything laugh

However, to attempt to put that into perspective, there are roughly 6,360,000,000 people alive on planet earth at this time. There are roughly 70,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 stars in the observable universe. If every single one of those stars had that many people living around it (and if I calculated correctly) each of those people would be able to have around 750,000 addresses under IPv6.

But anyway, the simple fact of the matter is, IPv6 will be replacing IPv4 at some point. That fact alone means that it must be supported in the future.


To prove that I'm not just making stuff up.. (though for all I know, they might be grin)
World POPClock
Astronomers count the stars


If I knew now what I will know then... maybe things will have been different...
Re: IPv6 #80903 28/04/04 01:28 PM
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That number (340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211,456 ) is so large that it doesn't even mean anything -

actually, it means
three hundred and forty undecillion two hundred and eighty two decillion three hundred and sixty six nonillion nine hundred and twenty octillion nine hundred and thirty eight septillion four hundred and sixty three sextillion four hundred and sixty three quintillion three hundred and seventy four quadrillion six hundred and seven trillion four hundred and thirty one billion seven hundred and sixty eight million two hundred and eleven thousand four hundred and fifty six

PS: no, this is not a joke smile



DALnet #Helpdesk
I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand. -Confucius
Re: IPv6 #80904 28/04/04 01:47 PM
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Quote:
three hundred and forty undecillion two hundred and eighty two decillion three hundred and sixty six nonillion nine hundred and twenty octillion nine hundred and thirty eight septillion four hundred and sixty three sextillion four hundred and sixty three quintillion three hundred and seventy four quadrillion six hundred and seven trillion four hundred and thirty one billion seven hundred and sixty eight million two hundred and eleven thousand four hundred and fifty six


Bet you can't say that 3 times fast :tongue:

Re: IPv6 #80905 28/04/04 03:28 PM
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Building on what LocutusofBorg said: <extremely evil grin>

Currently, the internet uses IPv4 technology, which allows for 2^32 nodes to be connected to the internet (assuming no network address translation is being done), which amounts to 4, 294, 967, 296 possible nodes. In spoken word terms, that is four billion, two hundred and ninety-four million, nine hundred and sixty-seven thousand, two hundred and ninety-six possible nodes.

The new technology, IPv6, allows for significantly more nodes to be connected simultaneously. Specifically, 2^128 nodes will be possible, which amounts to 340, 282, 366, 920, 938, 463, 463, 374, 607, 431, 768, 211, 456 possible nodes. In spoken words, that is a whopping three hundred and fourty undecillion, two hundred and eighty-two decillion, three hundred and sixty-six nonillion, nine hundred and twenty octillion, nine hundred and thirty-eight septillion, four hundred and sixty-three sextillion, four hundred and sixty-three quintillion, three hundred and seventy-four quadrillion, six hundred and seven trillion, four hundred and thirty-one billion, seven hundred and sixty-eight million, two hundred and eleven thousand, four hundred and fifty-six nodes.

And it gets better.

MD5 hashing technology also has 2^128 possible hashes. however, the newer standard, SHA1, has more still - 2^140 to be exact, which amounts to (are you sitting down?) 1, 393, 796, 574, 908, 163, 946, 345, 982, 392, 040, 522, 594, 123, 776 possible hashes or, in spoken words, one tredecillion, three hundred and ninety-three duodecillion, seven hundred and ninety-six undecillion, five hundred and seventy-four decillion, nine hundred and eight nonillion, one hundred and sixty-three octillion, nine hundred and fourty-six septillion, three hundred and fourty-five sextillion, nine hundred and eighty-two quintillion, three hundred and ninety-two quadrillion, fourty trillion, five hundred and twenty-two billion, five hundred and ninety-four million, one hundred and twenty-three thousand, seven hundred and seventy-six.

And it gets better still.

Public-key cryptography uses larger numbers still - 2^1024 or more is common. That amounts to (OK, this is getting rediculous) 179, 769, 313, 486, 231, 590, 772, 930, 519, 078, 902, 473, 361, 797, 697, 894, 230, 657, 273, 430, 081, 157, 732, 675, 805, 500, 963, 132, 708, 477, 322, 407, 536, 021, 120, 113, 879, 871, 393, 357, 658, 789, 768, 814, 416, 622, 492, 847, 430, 639, 474, 124, 377, 767, 893, 424, 865, 485, 276, 302, 219, 601, 246, 094, 119, 453, 082, 952, 085, 005, 768, 838, 150, 682, 342, 462, 881, 473, 913, 110, 540, 827, 237, 163, 350, 510, 684, 586, 298, 239, 947, 245, 938, 479, 716, 304, 835, 356, 329, 624, 224, 137, 216 possible encryption keys, or in spoken words (EXTREMELY deep breath), one hundred and seventy-nine uncentillion, seven hundred and sixty-nine centillion, three hundred and thirteen novemnonagintillion, four hundred and eighty-six octononagintillion, two hundred and thirty-one septennonagintillion, five hundred and ninety sexnonagintillion, seven hundred and seventy-two quinnonagintillion, nine hundred and thirty quattuornonagintillion, five hundred and nineteen trenonagintillion, seventy-eight duononagintillion, nine hundred and two unnonagintillion, four hundred and seventy-three nonagintillion, three hundred and sixty-one novemoctogintillion, seven hundred and ninety-seven octooctogintillion, six hundred and ninety-seven septoctogintillion, eight hundred and ninety-four sexoctogintillion, two hundred and thirty quinoctogintillion, six hundred and fifty-seven quattuoroctogintillion, two hundred and seventy-three treoctogintillion, four hundred and thirty duooctogintillion, eighty-one unoctogintillion, one hundred and fifty-seven octogintillion, seven hundred and thirty-two novemseptuagintillion, six hundred and seventy-five octoseptuagintillion, eight hundred and five septenseptuagintillion, five hundred sexseptuagintillion, nine hundred and sixty-three quinseptuagintillion, one hundred and thirty-two quattuorseptuagintillion, seven hundred and eight treseptuagintillion, four hundred and seventy-seven duoseptuagintillion, three hundred and twenty-two unseptuagintillion, four hundred and seven septuagintillion, five hundred and thirty-six novemsexagintillion, twenty-one octosexagintillion, one hundred and twenty septensexagintillion, one hundred and thirteen sexsexagintillion, eight hundred and seventy-nine quinsexagintillion, eight hundred and seventy-one quattuorsexagintillion, three hundred and ninety-three tresexagintillion, three hundred and fifty-seven duosexagintillion, six hundred and fifty-eight unsexagintillion, seven hundred and eighty-nine sexagintillion, seven hundred and sixty-eight novemquinquagintillion, eight hundred and fourteen octoquinquagintillion, four hundred and sixteen septenquinquagintillion, six hundred and twenty-two sexquinquagintillion, four hundred and ninety-two quinquinquagintillion, eight hundred and forty-seven quattuorquinquagintillion, four hundred and thirty trequinquagintillion, six hundred and thirty-nine duoquinquagintillion, four hundred and seventy-four unquinquagintillion, one hundred and twenth-four quinquagintillion, three hundred and seventy-seven novemquadragintillion, seven hundred and sixty-seven octoquadragintillion, eight hundred and ninety-three septenquadragintillion, four hundred and twenty-four sexquadragintillion, eight hundred and sixty-five quinquadragintillion, four hundred and eighty-five quattuorquadragintillion, two hundred and seventy-six trequadragintillion, three hundred and two duoquadragintillion, two hundred and nineteen unquadragintillion, six hundred and one quadragintillion, two hundred and forty-six novemtrigintillion, ninety-four octotrigintillion, one hundred and nineteen septentrigintillion, four hundred and fifty-three sextrigintillion, eighty-two quintrigintillion, nine hundred and fifty-two quattuortrigintillion, eight-five tretrigintillion, five duotrigintillion, seven hundred and sixty-eight untrigintillion, eight hundred and thirty-eight trigintillion, one hundred and fifty novemvigintillion, six hundred and eighty-two octovigintillion, three hundred and forty-two septenvigintillion, four hundred and sixty-two sexvigintillion, eight hundred and eighty-one quinvigintillion, four hundred and seventy-three quattuorvigintillion, nine hundred and thirteen trevigintillion, one hundred and ten duovigintillion, five hundred and forty unvigintillion, eight hundred and twenty-seven vigintillion, two hundred and thirty-seven novemdecillion, one hundred and sixty-three octodecillion, three hundred and fifty septendecillion, five hundred and ten sexdecillion, six hundred and eighty-four quindecillion, five hundred and eighty-six quattuordecillion, two hundred and ninety-eight tredecillion, two hundred and thirty-nine duodecillion, nine hundred and forty-seven undecillion, two hundred and forty-five decillion, nine hundred and thirty-eight nonillion, four hundred and seventy-nine octillion, seven hundred and sixteen septillion, three hundred and four sextillion, eight hundred and thirty-five quintillion, three hundred and fifty-six quadrillion, three hundred and twenty-nine trillion, six hundred and twenty-four billion, two hundred and twenty-four million, one hundred and thirty-seven thousand, two hundred and sixteen.

Source (his data, my corrections and additions)

One GOOGOL is a ONE followed by 100 zeroes. (10^100, or 10, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000)

One GOOGOLPLEX is a ONE followed by one googol zeroes. (10^10, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000) (you can't write a googolplex, even in a million years)

Source


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Re: IPv6 #80906 28/04/04 04:19 PM
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Just being a little nit-picky (for fun, so don't think I'm being like someone else that likes to be offending)...

The number you wrote out has many decimals in it.. ("and" means decimal in math when verbally saying the number).
grin

Ok, nit-picking done..

Re: IPv6 #80907 28/04/04 07:00 PM
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to no one in particular .. does anyone have an aspirin? grin


I refuse to engage in a battle of wits with an unarmed person. wink
Re: IPv6 #80908 28/04/04 07:01 PM
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Wolfie Offline
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Try BC, it's better for headaches. (Powdered aspirin basically, my headaches hate the stuff because it works so well)

Re: IPv6 #80909 28/04/04 07:11 PM
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Hrung Offline
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You are correct, but what I was trying to say is that numbers that large just do not fit into the human mind. They don't mean anything to us because we have never seen that many of anything ever before. In fact, the number I gave for the total stars in the observable universe was too big, and I didn't want to do that. To give some help imagining it, check out this link. If stars were pennies, they would make about 70,000 of the cubes on the last page.

Fun little fact: 2^128 has 39 digits... to find the circumference of the observable universe to within the diameter of a single proton only requires 39 digits of pi.


If I knew now what I will know then... maybe things will have been different...
Re: IPv6 #80910 28/04/04 10:19 PM
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Wolfie Offline
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What is the definition of "observable universe" anyway? Since the universe goes on forever, and we are merely in the a galaxy (Milky Way, good candy bar too).. Are you referring only to our galaxy, or beyond that?

I wonder if IPv6 would give us enough IP's to fill out galaxy with internet access.... grin

Re: IPv6 #80911 28/04/04 10:47 PM
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"observable universe" refers to the part of the universe that we can observe. So basically, as far as our most powerful telescopes/satellites can see.

As for the universe going on forever, it's probably best not to start that topic up, there's lotsa clever people here who'll give their opinion on whether that's true or not...the conversation could go on forever <G>

Regards,


Mentality/Chris
Re: IPv6 #80912 28/04/04 11:31 PM
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Quote:
As for the universe going on forever, it's probably best not to start that topic up, there's lotsa clever people here who'll give their opinion on whether that's true or not...the conversation could go on forever <G>


Nah, cos the universe WILL go on forever. :tongue:

The total effect of dark matter (the universes repellant force) is greater than that of gravity thus meaning the universe will forever expand. After a while, all the stars will nova, filling the universe (such as it will be) with a sea of radiation. Joy.

Who would've thought the ultimate fate of the universe could be found on the mIRC forum?

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